MATTHEW GAMBER
The photographs in the series "Any Color You Like" are an experiment in how photography can confuse our perception of information. These photographs represent objects whose primary function is to simulate our observation of color. When these items are rendered in a traditional black-and-white format, the information that remains is merely an abstraction of its previous form.
Above, "3D Glasses."

(Image 1 of 6)


PhotoServe/Contact Info
MATTHEW GAMBER
The photographs in the series "Any Color You Like" are an experiment in how photography can confuse our perception of information. These photographs represent objects whose primary function is to simulate our observation of color. When these items are rendered in a traditional black-and-white format, the information that remains is merely an abstraction of its previous form.
Above, "A Color Notation and Interaction of Color."

(Image 2 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
MATTHEW GAMBER
The photographs in the series "Any Color You Like" are an experiment in how photography can confuse our perception of information. These photographs represent objects whose primary function is to simulate our observation of color. When these items are rendered in a traditional black-and-white format, the information that remains is merely an abstraction of its previous form.
Above, "Gone With The Wind Laserdisc."

(Image 3 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
MATTHEW GAMBER
The photographs in the series "Any Color You Like" are an experiment in how photography can confuse our perception of information. These photographs represent objects whose primary function is to simulate our observation of color. When these items are rendered in a traditional black-and-white format, the information that remains is merely an abstraction of its previous form.
Above, "Farnsworth Munsell 100 Hue Test."

(Image 4 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
MATTHEW GAMBER
The photographs in the series "Any Color You Like" are an experiment in how photography can confuse our perception of information. These photographs represent objects whose primary function is to simulate our observation of color. When these items are rendered in a traditional black-and-white format, the information that remains is merely an abstraction of its previous form.
Above, "Munsell Color Tree."

(Image 5 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
MATTHEW GAMBER
The photographs in the series "Any Color You Like" are an experiment in how photography can confuse our perception of information. These photographs represent objects whose primary function is to simulate our observation of color. When these items are rendered in a traditional black-and-white format, the information that remains is merely an abstraction of its previous form.
Above, "Bengal Cat on Gone With The Wind Poster."

(Image 6 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
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